Kingston Park Foreshore Reserve

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Project History

The Kingston Park Foreshore has been subject to a number of council led projects since the State Government announced the Coast Park initiative in 2001.

The chronology includes:

  • 2002 - Tjilbruke Dreaming Tracks Project - towards a management framework.
  • 2004 - Kingston Park Urban Design Framework.
  • 2009 - Australian Cultural Heritage Management undertook a Heritage Survey of Kingston Park.
  • 2010 - Kaurna Nations Cultural Heritage Association assembled with council to discuss the significant and future of the site.
  • 2011 - Council engaged consultants (GHD and Hemisphere) to undertake a concept plan for the site.
  • 2015 - Council undertook a Master Plan of the site led by consultants GHD.
  • 2016/17 - the first stage of the Master Plan, the coast park pathway in front of Kingston Coastal reserve was designed and funding was granted from the State Governments Open Space Fund.
  • 2017 - Aboriginal Heritage Act Section 23 consultation process took place in relation to the Coast Park designs.
  • 2017/2018 - Council received additional feedback from Kaurna Elders and members of the local community regarding the concerns with the final masterplan design and desire for a focus on a paired back design with a greater natural and heritage focus.
  • 2018 - Masterplan implementation was placed on hold to prepare a Cultural Heritage Management Agreement.
  • 2019 - Repatriation of the remains of 13 Kaurna Old People, brought back from the Natural History Museum in the UK and South Australian at Kingston Park Coastal Reserve.
  • 2019 - Following further engagement with Kaurna and the local residents, Council agreed that a review of the Master Plan is required to achieve the best outcome for the site and the community.

Project History

The Kingston Park Foreshore has been subject to a number of council led projects since the State Government announced the Coast Park initiative in 2001.

The chronology includes:

  • 2002 - Tjilbruke Dreaming Tracks Project - towards a management framework.
  • 2004 - Kingston Park Urban Design Framework.
  • 2009 - Australian Cultural Heritage Management undertook a Heritage Survey of Kingston Park.
  • 2010 - Kaurna Nations Cultural Heritage Association assembled with council to discuss the significant and future of the site.
  • 2011 - Council engaged consultants (GHD and Hemisphere) to undertake a concept plan for the site.
  • 2015 - Council undertook a Master Plan of the site led by consultants GHD.
  • 2016/17 - the first stage of the Master Plan, the coast park pathway in front of Kingston Coastal reserve was designed and funding was granted from the State Governments Open Space Fund.
  • 2017 - Aboriginal Heritage Act Section 23 consultation process took place in relation to the Coast Park designs.
  • 2017/2018 - Council received additional feedback from Kaurna Elders and members of the local community regarding the concerns with the final masterplan design and desire for a focus on a paired back design with a greater natural and heritage focus.
  • 2018 - Masterplan implementation was placed on hold to prepare a Cultural Heritage Management Agreement.
  • 2019 - Repatriation of the remains of 13 Kaurna Old People, brought back from the Natural History Museum in the UK and South Australian at Kingston Park Coastal Reserve.
  • 2019 - Following further engagement with Kaurna and the local residents, Council agreed that a review of the Master Plan is required to achieve the best outcome for the site and the community.

Can't find the information you want? check our FAQS  first and if you still can't find the details ask below and we will endeavour to have an answer for you in the next office 48 hours.

Alternatively you can call 8229 9999 between office the hours of  9-5pm Monday - Friday.


Q&A

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    Hi Please may you outline how consideration been given to the community of windsurfers who currently rig and launch from the area? Thanks

    H asked almost 5 years ago

    Hi,

    Thank for your question. Consideration has been given to a wide variety of users for both the Coast Park shared use pathway and the redevelopment of the Kingston Park Coastal Reserve. We have liaised with the Seacliff Surf Life Saving Club and are continuing discussions around the pathway connection in front of the club and their requirements.

    Beach access points have been considered including where they are currently located and the need for new / additional access points, particularly given the changes occurring to the Caravan Park as part of their upgrade. The aim is to improve access to the beach for all users where possible and practicable. If there are specific requirements that we should be aware of and consider further, please let us know via email mail@holdfast.sa.gov.au or contacting 8229 9999.


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    Is there a comparison schedule of the space utilisation between the existing park and the proposed design to demonstrate the changes to the level of amenity, eg formal and informal play space, informal sitting/picnic areas, dry grass , irrigated grass etc? This will help in understanding the changes envisaged by the plan?

    db asked almost 5 years ago

    Hi,

    So far we have not undertaken a detailed comparison of space utilisation for the existing Coastal Reserve compared with the Draft Master Plan of the proposed redeveloped Coastal Reserve. Council’s Open Space Strategy seeks to establish Kingston Park Costal Reserve as a quality nature based regional destination through enhanced infrastructure, landscape, access and services to cater for residents and visitors. The proposed Draft Master Plan aims to seek a balance between active and passive spaces and to broaden the appeal of the reserve to all age groups.


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    Whilst the Tourist Park is not part of this study, can you explain what the provisions are for visitor car parking within the Tourist Park as an alternative to the use of the modest central car park?

    db asked almost 5 years ago

    Hi,

    As you state the Brighton Caravan Park redevelopment is not part of this project. However, the Master Plan for this project was endorsed by Council in late 2014 and the development application for its redevelopment was assessed and approved by the State Government’s Development Assessment Commission. Council’s Development Plan which is the relevant statute for car parking assessment only required one car parking space for every caravan, cabin or dwelling site either located on the site or grouped within the park. The Master Plan complied with this requirement. There is no provision requiring assessment for visitor car parking to the site, however the adjacent Caravan Park Car Park can accommodate up to 30 vehicles in its current form.


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    The plan doesn't appear to have any provision for external amenity lighting, other than reference to flood lighting to the multipurpose court. Is it intended to provide some low level amenity lighting for night time access through the park?

    db asked almost 5 years ago

    Hi,

    As this is still a Draft Master plan, the detailed design drawings will consider in greater detail the infrastructure issues such as lighting along both the Coast Park shred use pathway and Kingston Park Coastal Reserve. It is intended that electrical supply will be available along the pathway and for shelters within the Coastal Reserve, which is consistent with other reserves within the Council area.


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    It is noted that the plan includes provision for sensitive refurbishment of the Tjilbruke spring and surrounds, however the detailed budget in the plan does not appear to have funds allocated for this work or indeed any allowance for other spring water environmental management. Can you please clarify what is intended here?

    db asked almost 5 years ago

    Hi,

    The Draft Master Plan Report includes a very indicative cost estimate to construct the entire project based upon the Draft Master Plan by a quantity surveyor. This is identified under ‘Project Staging’ and ‘Indicative Cost Estimate’ section in the Draft Master Plan Report available to download on the engagement website.

    At this time, Stage 4 which includes the Tjilbruke Spring site does not cost rehabilitation / revegetation of the Spring site. However there are a number of identified funding opportunities which Council could apply for to do this work and this is detailed under ‘Funding Opportunities’ in the Draft Master Plan Report; specifically pages 59 and 60.


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    As lack of car parking is clearly going to be an issue, the current proposal reduces the net car formal and informal car parking provision, can you explain how this will be addressed, will there be a traffic and demand study conducted to inform a considered and detailed strategy for this issue?

    db asked almost 5 years ago

    Hi,

    The Draft Master Plan comprises two key projects; completing the Kingston Park section of the State Government’s Coast Park project (a continuous shared use pathway running along Adelaide’s coast line) and the redevelopment of the Kingston Park Coastal Reserve.

    The accompanying Draft Master Plan report explains that the existing Caravan Park car park is proposed to be reconfigured and narrowed to align with standard car park sizes, making it safer by complying with the relevant Australian Standards and providing additional room for an amenity node. This would also facilitate disabled parking spaces. Currently there 31 car parks and this figure may be reduced to 28 spaces depending on the design. Constraints to making the car park bigger or reorientating it include a registered burial site immediately to the north and the Tjilbruke Spring (another registered site) to the south. However, as this is at a draft stage, a detailed traffic assessment and detailed design have not been undertaken at this point. It is likely that a traffic assessment/study for the precinct will be undertaken during the busy spring/summer period. Currently there are approximately 185 car parking spaces within 350 metres to the north, 150 metres to the east and 450 metres to the south of the current Caravan Park car park.


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    What is being done about disability inclusion? For example, access to the beach or ocean, playground?

    Scott asked almost 5 years ago

    Hi,

    Consideration has been given to disability access to both the beach from the Coast Park pathway and to the adventure playground area. Indeed other sections of our Coast Park pathway have access disabled access locations such as at the Seacliff Yacht Club car park, in front of the Seacliff Hotel and at various other sections where there is a ramped pathway to the beach in lieu of steps. These can be used by prams as well as people with wheel chairs.

    At this stage, the Draft Master Plan shows a disabled access point in front of the Caravan Park beach front camping sites to the north of the Caravan Park car park however there is also likely to be disabled access point from this car park along with a minimum of one disabled car parking spaces. The two existing beach access points along Burnham Road further south are unlikely to facilitate disabled access given regular high tide levels against the rockwall and obvious difference in grade levels from road to the beach to achieve ramp access.

    From the Seacliff Yacht Club car park to the southern end of the Council along Burnham Road, there is likely to be up to three disabled access points.


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    Will some attempt be made to separate cyclists from walkers, or at least to control their speed? For instance, on campus in the University of Western Australia cyclists are required to travel at walking pace when near pedestrians. I write this as it would in some way protect children and dogs - and adults - from speeding cyclists. The notice could direct cyclists who wish to speed to use the road. (Dr) E. Wallace-Carter.

    Eve asked almost 5 years ago

    Hi,

    Thank you for your question. As a State Government initiative, Coast Park is designed as a shared-used facility providing a pedestrian and cyclist friendly foreshore environment however it does not replace on-road cycle lanes.

    The installation of guidance speed signs along the Coast Park indicating a speed limit has been previously considered in response to concerns raised with shared safety, both for this Council’s Coast Park sections and other foreshore Councils Coast Park shared use pathways. The State Government has indicated previously that they would not be supportive of this proposal.

    Notwithstanding this, it is desirable to consider the use of this interface between path users and design can used to better manage these interactions. Path users should use a speed appropriate to the existing conditions.

    Consultation with the State Government will continue to occur throughout the design process with their guidance sought on the implementation of any further traffic safety measures etc.